Seven Blog Posts in Three Days

Google I/O 2017 Keynote

Last week Barbara and I attended the annual Google I/O Developer’s conference in Mountain View.  We’ve attended every year since the first one back in 2008 and were glad to continue the streak.

As you may have noticed from my last few short posts here, I’ve been doing more writing over on Justia’s Legal Marketing & Technology Blog this year than in years past and as such I proposed the idea of live blogging sessions at Google I/O this year.  My suggestion was readily approved and I set to work on planning which sessions I would Live Blog.

In the end I Live Blogged 7  sessions over the course of the 3 day conference and wanted to make sure those that follow me on my personal blog knew about them.  Check out the list of sessions I ended up blogging, with links over to the individual live blog posts after the break.

Continue reading “Seven Blog Posts in Three Days”

Looking forward to the Third annual 24 hour Disney Day

Barbara and I are ready to attend the Rock Your Disney Side 24 hour event at Disneyland Park this Friday.  For the third year in a row, Disneyland will be open for 24 hours from 6 am Friday to 6 am on Saturday morning.  This year’s hashtag is #RockYourDisneySide and the event has a Heroes and Villains theme.  Looking forward to an exhausting but fun day.

We are now a month and a half after Barbara’s last chemotherapy treatment and while we still need to be careful with her out in crowds and sun, we hope this event marks the beginning of a return to normalcy for our lives.  She’s not officially marked as being “in remission” yet, but her counts have been stable for the last few months and she is no longer on the chemotherapy, so we are confident and hopeful that she will be declared in remission soon.  What better way to celebrate than a return to “The Happiest Place on Earth”

Walk with me to End Lupus

Nick after the 2013 San Francisco Walk to End Lupus Now

As many of you know my wife Barbara has Lupus and in October she experienced a flare up of her lupus that put her into the hospital.  Before this flare up occurred however, I was already planning on doing a 5K charity walk called the Walk to End Lupus Now.  After the flare up occurred it became even more important to me to participate in the walk and raise money to help fund Lupus research and awareness.  Me and my boss Tim walked the 5K and I’m proud to say the two of us raised $1600 for the Lupus Foundation.

This coming October I will be participating in the walk again.  If you would like to sponsor me in my walk, you can do so at my donor page for the event here.  If you want to help even more though, I encourage you to get out there and walk with me.  You can Join Team Moline and  walk with me at the 2014 San Francisco Walk to End Lupus Now on Sunday October 26, 2014 in Golden Gate Park in San Francisco.  If you aren’t in the bay area but want to walk to raise awareness and money for Lupus Research, the Lupus Foundation hosts walks around the country throughout the year.

Just last week Barbara had what is expected to be her last (6th) Chemotherapy treatment of this particular flare up and the doctor is optimistic that this particular flare up is under control.  This is a tremendous blessing to hear as her previous flare up when she was 12 required 15 Chemotherapy treatments over the course of 3 years.  The doctor is also slowly stepping down Barbara’s dosage of Prednisone (steroids).  She is now taking just 1 20 milligram pill per day.  At the height of the flare up she was taking 60 milligrams per day.

If you would like to know more about Lupus and how it effects people who have it, I encourage you to check out Barbara’s story on her blog, and you can also read more about Lupus at the Lupus Foundation of America Website at lupus.org.

Looking at Life from the Other Side of the Glass

Nick Moline, proud Glasshole

It is hard to believe that it was just 1 year and 1 week ago, Google uploaded to its YouTube channel, a teaser video for a project they had been working out of from their top-secret “moonshot” [x] Labs called Project Glass.

The project was ambitious, an augmented reality layer over your very life, answering questions before you even asked, and all around simplifying your life.

2 Months later at Google I/O 2012, Google staged a “demonstration” involving a blimp, skydivers, BMX Trick bikers and more to show off the device as what seemed like little more than a network connected GoPro camera.  They then asked Developers who are interested in getting an early look at the technology if they would be willing to fork over $1,500 for the chance to be one of the first non-Google employees with this whole new class of Technology.

I and 2,000 other attendees happily stood in a long line to put down our commitment to try it out.  Then, months of agonizing waiting began.  Waiting for a future that was so close we could taste it.

Continue reading “Looking at Life from the Other Side of the Glass”

Not too fat to journey through space… mountain!

As many of my friends know, I am a huge Disney Fan.  A year and a half ago, on a trip to Disneyland with my wife and Brother-in-law I went through the line queue at Space Mountain and attempted to get into the ride vehicle.  Sadly, I couldn’t even sit down, let alone pull down the lap bar, and I was forced to get off the ride and wait while they enjoyed it without me.

Later that trip in July of 2011, at Disney California Adventure, I attempted to ride California Screamin’ only to once again sadly have to wait while they enjoyed themselves without me.

As those of you who follow my blog know, I’ve lost a lot of weight since that trip.  On Tuesday, December 11th, I went in for my monthly weigh in and I was 339.6 pounds.  This is a total of 150.6 pounds lost!

Nick Rides Space Mountain
Nick Rides Space Mountain

Friday, December 14th, 2012 My wife and I went to Disneyland again, and the first thing I did that Friday morning is make a bee-line for Space Mountain.  I’m happy to report that the weight loss was enough, I was successfully able to ride Space Mountain, and the proof is above.

The next day, December 15th, 2012, we had a great time at Disney California Adventure, and like before I made it my goal to ride California Screamin’.  I’m happy to report that once again I was successful and I was able to ride it as well.

Both rides were fantastic (in fact Space Mountain seemed even better than I remember from my childhood) and were a great encouragement to me that my weight-loss efforts are working.

Google I/O 2012 starts tomorrow morning

The next version of Android is officially Jelly BeansGoogle I/O is almost here, and the Google Developers have created a nifty widget for enabling the live stream of the video on your blog, as well as embedding my own Google+ stream as a Live Blog of sorts, so head on after the break for my live blog where I will post about the stream while it happens.

In preparation for I/O, on the Google Developers Plus page, the Development team has now officially confirmed the name of the next version of Android will be “Jelly Beans.”  The confirmation comes with a new statue on the Googleplex Lawn. Continue reading “Google I/O 2012 starts tomorrow morning”

Google’s Code Mistake, and what they did to make it right

Google I/OThis morning Google opened up a programming competition using the same system as Google Code Jam (they called it the Google Code Jam Sprint to I/O) to win the right to buy 1 of 100 tickets to Google I/O.  Normal Registration for the conference closed 20 minutes after it opened back on March 27th due to the incredible demand, so naturally those developers who couldn’t get in before were excited and ready to battle for the chance to buy a ticket.

The competition consisted of 2 problems, programmers could write their code in any language (as long as the compiler is free to use).  It would work like this, you would write a program according to their specifications of the problem, and then you would submit it.  When you submit it, google would provide you with a file of sample input data and then give you 1 minute to run your code against that sample data and then submit the output to them.  They would then run a validator across the output and tell you if you were correct or not.  If you were correct, it would accept your answer, if not, it would reject it.

The first question went like this (paraphrasing)

The Google Store has M new designs of android mini-statues available, and they have L of each design in stock.  You, an avid collector and generous gifter, want to buy a certain number of each of these new designs (K1, K2KM). The problem is… the packages for these statues are all exactly the same, and don’t indicate what is inside, and you cannot open the package before purchasing.  What is the minimum number of packages you need to purchase to guarantee you have all of the statues you want in a worst-case scenario

The sample data was a list of lines in the following format for different test cases:
L M K1 K2 ... KM

For example:

5 3 4 2 1
5 3 5 5 5
5 2 1 5
6 4 0 0 0 0
2 4 5 1 2 3
0 3 4 1 2
9 5 1 1 1 1 1

Taking the first one (They have 5 each of 3 different designs, and you want 4 of the first, 2 of the second, and 1 of the third), the correct answer would be 14 (in order to guarantee you have at least 4 of the first, at least 2 of the second, and at least 1 of the third, you would have to buy enough that you would have ALL of all but 1 of them, and then the highest K for the remainder)
Answer = (L * (M-1)) + max(K)
The question also said that if it was impossible to get what you want, you should return -1 (like the 5th and 6th examples, you can’t buy more statues than they had available in the first place)

Now most programmers seeing something like the 4th test case there (6 4 0 0 0 0) would realize that if you don’t want to buy any of them, than the answer is 0 (minimum number to buy in order to get 0 statues is 0), so the basic pseudo code to solve this problem is:

function process_test_case(L = 0, M = 0, K = array()) {
     if (max(K) == 0) return 0
     elseif (max(K) > L) return -1
     else return (L * (M - 1)) + max(K)
}

There is just one problem… Google’s developers that came up with this test, didn’t think about the possibility where you don’t want any statues (max(K) == 0), so if you ran the above code and returned 0 on the sample 4, google’s validator would come across with “Incorrect”, on the other hand if you left that line out and only did the other 2 possibilities, it would say you were “correct”

Naturally a lot of the programmers who entered the competition were quite upset about this, and complained to Google via comments on the Google+ post that announced the competition.  Eventually google put up the following message saying that they realize they made a mistake:

We’ve made a mistake in problem A. The correct output is 0, but it is being judged as wrong because 4 of our problem writers have independently made the same bug in their solutions. We would like to apologize for the confusion this has caused. We will send an email to all participants shortly, announcing our plan to resolve this issue in the least unfair manner possible. We take a lot of precautions to prevent mistakes like this, but we have messed up this time

Now I did not enter this competition (I did the coding example just for the brain exercise, but I did not submit it) because I am already registered for Google I/O and didn’t need the additional ticket for myself, but some of my coworkers did enter the competition, and they received an email a little while ago which included the following:

As you know, we intended to provide an opportunity to buy Google I/O tickets to the top 100 scorers. In light of our mistake, we’ve decided instead to offer this opportunity to all participants who have submitted any solution to either of the two problems. Please watch your inbox for a registration code coming shortly.

That does indeed seem “least unfair,” everyone who tried the contest, gets to go to Google I/O.  If you are among those, (like my fellow coworkers), I look forward to seeing you in San Francisco on June 27th.

Google I/O 2012 Sells out in less than a half hour

Sold Out in less than 30 minutes
Google I/O sold out in Less than 30 minutes

Even though Google doubled the price (paid $450 last year, this year $900), Google I/O sold out even faster than last year.  Last year it took about 45 minutes for Google’s Developer conference to sell out, this year it was all over in just over 20 minutes according to a post on Google+ by Google VP Vic Gundotra.

I’m glad to say I will be at I/O this year once again, but all but one of my colleagues who tried to buy tickets were unable to acquire them.  Will I see you at Google I/O?

Google I/O 2012 Here I come

Google I/O 2012 Confirmation EmailI’m all registered to go to Google I/O 2012 on June 27, 2012.  I’ve been to every Google I/O so far (and Google Developer Day) before hand and am really looking forward to going again.  The price was really hiked up this year ($900 as opposed to $450 last year), but they have done away with the Early Registration discount, and they have extended the conference from 2 to 3 days this year.

The “real” price last year was $550 with an early-bird discount of $450, so when you consider there are no early birds this year, the increase is 38.9% for 50% more conference, so perhaps the increase isn’t so bad.

Thank you Veterans

Image Copyright flickr.com/look4uThis Veteran’s Day, I would like to honor family members who have served this country.

I would like to honor my Father, Richard V. Moline III, who served this country in the US Navy before I was born.

I would like to honor my Sister in Law, Betina Garcia, who currently serves this country as an Army Corporal.

I would like to honor the memory my Uncle, James Carr, who like my father, also served in the U.S. Navy.

I would like to honor the memory of wife’s Grandfather, Therman Branning, who served in World War 2, including as a member of the U.S. Army Cleanup Crew after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

I would like to honor my Uncle Herman Jones, who recently returned from Iraq where he was a member of the team training Iraqi Police Officers

I also would like to honor my friends who have served this country,

I would like to honor John Savage, who I worked with at GetOnTheAir, who served as an Army Ranger in Iraq.

I honor my old school friend Josh Brown who I know currently serves this country, though I don’t know with which branch of the military.

I know there are many more to honor who have served or are serving, and I’m very sorry if I forgot you in this post. I am very proud of everyone who has served this country.  God bless all of you.

Thank you to everyone who served in the U.S. Military, not just those I’ve listed here, but every single man and woman who has put on a uniform.  I owe my safety and security in this country to the sacrifice you’ve given to us.